History

In 2003, Cialis was approved by the FDA for the treatment of erectile dysfunction.

In the early 1990s, ICOS was undertaking research into a range of drugs for the treatment of heart disorders. In one of the trials, researchers noted that the male patients were experiencing an unusual number of erections. This was sufficiently important that further studies were put in hand. When the results were replicated, ICOS identified the active ingredients in their prototype known as IC351.

Later in 1994, the company was granted a patent for IC351 as a therapy for male impotence. Four years later, ICOS entered into a joint venture with Eli Lilly and Company and, as a result of their further research and testing, they were granted full FDA approval for Cialis.

Interaction with alcohol

You should not mix alcohol with any prescription medication. One of the effects of alcohol can be increasing/decreasing the effect of any drug you take. This can be dangerous.

In combination with Cialis, alcoholic drinks will reduce your blood pressure, which may cause dizziness and a general loss of coordination. Despite the fact that your heart rate will increase insignificantly, this will interfere with the flow of blood into the penis and slow the onset of an erection or reduce its hardness.

Before taking Cialis

Cialis is a prescription medicine and, as with all medications, you should always consult your doctor before taking this medicine. Always remember to report any allergies to medicines, foods or other substances that you have.

You may also have to pass full physical check-up to ensure that you will not endanger your health by suddenly increasing your existing level of sexual activity. Finally, you should report any specific problems or abnormalities that may have affected your sexual performance.

You should not take Cialis if you have:

  • liver or kidney problems and particularly if you are already having dialysis
  • recently had a stroke or heart attack because attempting or having sexual intercourse may dangerously affect your cardiovascular system
  • an allergic reaction to its components